• pupenhausen@unitybox.de

Kleinengstingen

………..updated in February 2015.

Below are a few photos of Kleinengstingen. Just click on them to get the picture in original size.
Im Übrigen, all these pictures came from the WWW and I do NOT claim copyright.
I have edited some of them with ‘paintshop‘ to show where the tracks ran and the ‘lay-of-the-land’.


    

The above is your plan, which I really like.
The Deutsche Reichsbahn line comes in from the top left hand corner.
From the lower left hand side the Hohenzollerische Landesbahn (HzL) line comes from Gammertingen and ends here.
As the HzL arrived in Kleinengstingen after the DRG, the tracks were laid behind the station and the only connection between the two companies was east (right) of the station area.

 

Above is a picture from 1935 taken from the hill behind Kleinengstingen looking north. As I mentioned, click on it to get the full size version.
The next picture is the same with my scribbles on it. I have tried to show where the different lines came from to meet at Kleinengstingen Bhf.

 

This next picture is already in BundesBahn times but shows that not much had changed.

You can clearly see that the Station was outside the village and set in a rural scenery. Apart from the WLZ (Württembergische Warenzentrale WLZ Raiffeisen AG) and later other small industrial buildings, it really was out in the country.

The postcard below, made before WWI but in the 2o Century, gives a basic idea of the DRG and HzL lines running into Kleinengstingen.

By the way, Kleinengstingen and Grossengstingen lie very close to each other. Nowadays it is a veritabel conurbation! Grossengstingen was tradionally Catholic and Kleinengstingen Protestant. Not that that matters today, but it makes it easy to tell them apart in photos. Grossengstingen church has the barock ‘onion’ steeple whereas Kleinenstingen the more frugal ‘spitz’.

You probably know the next pictures. I have tried to put them in chronological order but – hey – who really knows.
It starts in the 1960s when the line was already falling into ruin. The pictures may, however, give some indication of the positioning of buildings, track, etc. which might be useful when modeling the composition. (I’d love to have an 8 meter length! fnarr fnarr.)

 

 

The track (and trains) from the DRG came in onto a platform left of the station building in the above picture. The trains from the HzL came in on the rough road behind the station, to the right in the above picture. The HzL line came in between the station building and goods depot/WLZ.

The next set of pictures I presume to be from the 1970s after the line from Reutlingen was closed. Not sure though, I’ll leave it to you to work it out . 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notice the large WLZ building in the last picture.

And, of course, the Buffers at the end of the ex-DRG/BundesBahn track!
This is where the line continued to Lichtenstein and down the rack to Honau! ***sigh*** Pleasant memories.

The WLZ building is still there as evidenced by this picture…

…a modern Hzl unit in Kleinengstingen.

As you see, the goods sheds and agriculture depot were actually on the HzL side of the area. It made any shunting/goods workings very interesting for such a small rural way-station, the picture below is only a suggestion. Yellow = DRG, Blue = HzL, Pink = goods.

 

I have also included a ‘Kursbuch’ timetable ofthe Reichsbahn Direktion Stuttgart from 1933.

Not quite the year you are targeting, but it should give an idea of the passenger services on the line.

These latest pictures are from a thread in Drehscheibe Online which show the journey of a local goods train over the Alb in 1975.
In Kleinenstigen these pictures were made as the locomotive dropped its train and ran around for the return journey tender first

 

 

 

I can recommend two further books in additon to your Transpress Book on the BR 97.5. They are more about the line in general. They are, however, probably quite hard to find as they are quite specialised.
The first is “Nebenbahn Reutlingen – Schelklingen” by Rudolf P. Pavel ISBN 3-928786-23-7

 

The second is “Schwäbische Alb-Eisenbahn” by Dieter Reichhold ISBN 3-9805531-7-5

 

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……………updated in April 2016

As I said in the RoG forum, the area around the Kleinengstingen station has changed so much in the last years that I was not really able to photograph much countryside there.

The photo below is a “stitched” 360 degree view made up of a number of individual pictures. Click on it to view the full sized version. It starts and ends with the silver BMW.

 

The following series are just a series of snaps I made as I walked eastwards out of the station in the direction of Münsingen. The new looking cables etc. are part of the test set-up for securing the station with “spring switches” (thanks Boyce!) which always return to a default position.

 

 

 

 

The next series are just looking back in the opposite direction (West) towards the station.

 

 

 

This last one shows a cleaned up kilometre marker showing 15.5Kms from Reutlingen.

100 metres nearer to the station is a slightly more ruined kilometre marker showing 15.4Kms from Reutlingen.

As I got nearer to the single point where the HzL joined the original DRG/DB lines, I noticed something which might be of use to you. The DRG/DB track used steel sleepers whereas the HzL uses wooden sleepers. Only the point itself is set on wooden sleepers as can be seen in the following pictures.

 

 

 

Next are a few photos of the DRG/DB side of the station showing what is left of platform 2 where the now vanished ‘Gleis’ 2 was.

 

 

 

Finally a series showing the HzL looking West in the direction of Gammertingen and then back towards the station entrance.

 

 

 

 

As you can see, it’s not much of a scoop! The area is now so built up and the station so run down that it is nothing like it’s hay-days in the 1920s and 30s.